Your Health: Common types of cancer
by Terry Hollenbeck, M.D.
Mar 13, 2014 | 1621 views | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this article I would like to summarize information for a variety of common cancers as the second of my three-part series on the disease.

- Breast: More than 225,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected this year among women and over 2,000 cases in men. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Increasing age is the most common risk factor. The survival rate has improved dramatically due to early detection and improving treatments.

- Prostate: Close to 250,000 new cases of prostate cancer are expected this year. It is the most common cancer for men. Increasing age is the most common risk factor. Fortunately more than 90 percent of all prostate cancers are discovered before metastasis occurs, for which there is a five year survival rate close to 100 percent.

- Lung: Some 250,000 cases of lung cancer are expected this year which accounts for more deaths than any other cancer in both men and women. Cigarette smoking is by far the most common risk factor for lung cancer, and increases depending on the number of cigarettes smoked daily and the number of years of smoking. Death rates are dropping as a greater number of people are quitting smoking.

- Colon and Rectum: Over 150,000 cases of colorectal cancer are expected this year. Fortunately, the rate is falling significantly as more people are having colonoscopies which allows for the removal of precancerous polyps. Only 65 percent of eligible adults have been screened as recommended.

- Urinary bladder: Some 75,000 cases of bladder cancer are expected this year. It is found four times more frequently in men than in women. The most common symptom is blood in the urine.

- Uterine: Almost 50,000 cases are expected this year. Early symptoms include vaginal bleeding or spotting, as well as pelvic pain. Obesity and exposure to the hormone estrogen are risk factors.

- Melanoma: Close to 80,000 people will be diagnosed with melanoma, a potentially deadly skin cancer which often metastasizes to other parts of the body. Major risk factors include family history of melanoma, the presence of numerous moles (more than 50), and exposure to ultraviolet rays mostly from sun exposure, but also from tanning booths.

- Kidney: Over 65,000 cases of kidney cancer are expected this year. There are usually no symptoms early in the disease. Tobacco use is a strong risk factor.

- Lymphoma: Close to 70,000 cases of lymphoma will occur this year. This is a cancer of lymphocytes, a type of blood cell. Symptoms include swollen lymph glands, night sweats, weight loss, fatigue, and fever.

- Leukemia: Around 50,000 cases of leukemia are expected this year. Leukemia is a cancer of the bone marrow and blood cells. Leukemia is difficult to diagnose early because symptoms often mimic other less-serious conditions.

- Pancreas: Some 45,000 cases of pancreatic cancer are expected this year. Unfortunately, there are very few symptoms early in the disease, and is therefore not detected until it has spread to other organs. By the time it is detected treatment is often unsuccessful.

- Ovary: Over 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year. Symptoms are often nonspecific and include sensations of bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, and urinary urgency and frequency. Diagnosis is usually confirmed by a pelvic exam and ultrasound test.

- Cervical: Around 12,000 cases will occur this year in women. The most common symptom is abnormal vaginal bleeding. The Pap test is the most common screening method. The primary cause of cervical cancer is infection with the human papillomavirus transmitted by sexual intercourse. It can now be prevented by a vaccine, which is highly recommended for females and males from ages nine to 26.

In this article, I have attempted to cover the most common types of cancer. Unfortunately there is a long list of other less common cancers.

My next and final article on cancer will discuss treatment and prevention of cancer. It will publish March 28.

- Terry Hollenbeck, M.D., is an urgent-care physician at Palo Alto Medical Foundation Santa Cruz in Scotts Valley. Readers can view his previous columns on his website, valleydoctor.wordpress.com, or e-mail him at valleydoctor@sbcglobal.net. Information in this column is not intended to replace advice from your own health care professional. For any medical concern, consult your own doctor.

 

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